Thursday, June 11, 2009

#127 -365 Grass, Turf Lawm

Okay another uniquely Australian point of view, the tree shown to the left of this photo is in fact a "Grass Tree", in the past it had a derogatory name which I won't repeat, but is one of the most iconic of Australian plants. This one was located outside a restaurant in Noosa, but you can't (any longer) go out in the bush and just dig one up for your lawn.

This Link is the Gardening Australia page featuring the Little Garden Gnome "Colin Campbell: who I have told you is on the radio twice a week (on Saturday/Sunday 7 - 10am local time) if you want to hear a unique style show try googling 4bc (The Radio Staion) I think it is streamed to the web. This guy knows his onions.

In the Northern Territory these things tend to become enormous and the amount of wildlife I have seen attracted to them is outstanding, when in the Army I was camped to the South of the Kimberly Ranges in Western Australia for around six weeks and there were about a dozen Grass Trees in close proximity to my camp. Apart from the Lizards/Snakes that seemed to inhabit all of them, the number of Birds and Native Bees that visited daily would have been in the thousands, there were also great numbers of Wallaby/Kangaroo who used it as a shade bush and about seven separate Dingos who made a point of checking out each tree everyday.

I never saw the wild Camels in the area feed off them but they seemed to gravitate towards them as they passed, however the occasional wild donkey would grab a mouthful, but it must have tasted horrible as they never took a second bite. I bet that this wasn't what you expected for grass, but "Ya Pays Ya Money and Ya Takes Ya Chances".

8 comments:

mitt vattenhål said...

got some seeds for grass trees but unfortunately they died after beeing about 15 cms :-(

EstherF said...

Too bad you can't send me some seeds. I'd like one in my yard.

Lorri said...

I suppose they wouldn't survive our winters and, if they did, I would only be disappointed when the wallabys, dingos and camels didn't stop by...
Clever way to use the theme, Ron, and I enjoyed the explanation.

klsbear said...

Such a unique tree! I'm sure it would survive Lorri's winters after hearing all your tales of woe regarding the frozen tundra you're braving these days.

Clara said...

That is a facinating tree, Ron. We have something sort of similar here called a Yucca plant.

~Val said...

yet another interesting post...love the photo!

mljrbg said...

I love this tree!! It is really unique. Great info.

I have told anyone who will listen to me about my friend is Australia who has, by way of this blog, given us an awesome virtual tour of his homeland. See sometimes I have nice things to say about you!!

ellens365 said...

Another interesting post indeed! I know nursery people have tried to grow it here and south of here with some success.